Why Would You Need to Retain an Art Lawyer?

The law permeates all aspects of American life, and the art world is no different. You might wonder who would ever need to hire an art lawyer and why. Let's address both of those questions. Buying and Selling The simplest reason someone might need an attorney of this type is to have legal counsel for art transactions. Folks who buy art as an investment, for example, may need to document provenance. [Read More]

What Does A Trademark Lawyer Need From You?

You have a piece of intellectual property you wish to defend through a trademark. It is time to meet with a trademark lawyer so you can be sure you've checked all the boxes. However, a trademark attorney will need a few things from you to get the process moving. All Versions of the Proposed Trademark Trademarks typically include some form of artwork or typography. Even if a trademark is nothing but stylized letters, such as the IBM logo, it still identifies the brand in a way worth defending. [Read More]

4 Major Roles Of A Securities Law Attorney

Securities law attorneys have a wide range of responsibilities that cover the entire securities industry. They may represent companies that are issuing new securities, or they may represent investors who are buying or selling securities. In addition, they may provide legal advice to clients on a variety of matters related to the securities industry, including initial public offerings (IPOs), private placements, and mergers and acquisitions. Here are five of the major roles that securities law attorneys play: [Read More]

How Commercial Property Real Estate Law Is Different Than Residential

If someone is dealing with the legalities surrounding commercial property, they may think it can't be that different from dealing with residential real estate. A commercial property real estate attorney, though, would likely tell you there are plenty of differences. You may run into these four along the way. More Parties Involved with Deals Generally, residential property deals involve a seller, buyer, and perhaps a bank. When it comes to commercial properties, though, there may be several parties on both the acquiring and selling sides alone. [Read More]